Did My Garden Survive?

It was good to be home after three and a bit weeks away.  Arriving back late in the evening, I couldn’t wait till the morning to view my garden.  I had been wondering how the garden would cope without my attention for almost a month.

In the early morning light, I grabbed my camera phone to capture the first glimpses of the ‘reunion’.

Well as you can see the garden not only survived but perhaps thrived in my  absence (I like that I need my garden more than it needs me).

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Reduce Fruit Food Waste – Simple Icy Poles

Last weekend a dear friend came to visit.  She came visiting bearing gifts – huge tray of mangos, blueberries, strawberries and bananas.

We are a big fruit eating family however not so much with mangos.  So what do we do with a tray of mangos?

As I have mentioned in an earlier post, I have been baking mango muffins which the family love.

However with this Autumn heat we have been having,  I had another idea – mango flavoured icy poles!

Into a blender went five peeled and seeded mangos and the last of the strawberry yoghurt that was soon to go off. 

Note** I am intolerant to dairy and prefer not using it for animal compassionate reasons but as my husband and daughter do eat some dairy, you will find it in our fridge.  As I hate food waste, I prefer to use the yoghurt rather than chucking it out.  I just will not be eating these icy poles however I will make some more with yummy dairy free coconut cream, for everyone later.

Once blended, pour the mixture into icy pole moulds and freeze over night.

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Our Little One won’t eat mango fruit but gobbled TWO of these mango icy poles.  My first reaction was to limit her to just one until I asked myself “why”.  The yoghurt had very little sugar and besides, 85% of the ingredients was mango juice and pulp – no additives, no chemicals and no food colourings. Just healthy goodness.

My only tip is to use moulds that are designed better.  Ours are easily knocked over in the freezer or near small excited hands.

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Foraging for Chickpeas, Makes a Fun Children’s Activity and Snack

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Standing no taller than two foot, chickpea plants border our top veggie garden.

Little white flowers signal new pods are soon to grow.  This was my very first season with growing chickpeas and to be honest, I knew little before planting – just dived right in.

After seeing how few chickpeas, each plant produces, I actually thought I wouldn’t grow them again – long growing times, only two to five chickpeas grown from each plant is apparently normal but still disappointing.

I was disappointed until…

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……I discovered our Little One foraging for chickpeas in the garden – obviously inspired by seeing Mummy pick the tiny green pods.

We sat under the shade of a large tree, popping the pods to access the fresh chickpeas.  Not waiting till the pods were dry, meant that the pods and peas were green.  Oh my goodness, the green chickpeas were so delightfully sweet.  Our Little One ate them all up (except two that I was quick enough to throw in my mouth).

We then went foraging for ripe cherry tomatoes.  Garden food foraging is always an exciting activity for children – picking their own healthy snacks!

In conclusion, I will be growing chickpeas again, just HEAPS MORE of them.

Note on the 3rd of March 2015, I wrote an update of this post.